The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations on six continents.

Jesuits work in education (founding schools, colleges, universities, and seminaries), intellectual research, and cultural pursuits.

The society is characterized by its ministries in the fields of missionary work, human rights, social justice and, most notably, higher education.

Moreover, he should show himself ready to reconcile the estranged, compassionately assist and serve those who are in prisons or hospitals, and indeed, to perform any other works of charity, according to what will seem expedient for the glory of God and the common good.

A fresco depicting Ignatius of Loyola receiving the papal bull Regimini militantis Ecclesiae from Pope Paul III was created after 1743 by Johann Christoph Handke in the Church of Our Lady Of the Snow in Olomouc.

He composed the Spiritual Exercises to help others follow the teachings of Jesus Christ.

In 1534, Ignatius and six other young men, including Francis Xavier and Peter Faber, gathered and professed vows of poverty, chastity, and later obedience, including a special vow of obedience to the Pope in matters of mission direction and assignment.

Jesuits also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue.

Ignatius of Loyola, a Basque nobleman from the Pyrenees area of northern Spain, founded the society after discerning his spiritual vocation while recovering from a wound sustained in the Battle of Pamplona.In the United States the Jesuits have historical ties to 28 colleges and universities and 61 high schools.The degree to which the Jesuits are involved in the administration of each institution varies.In the words of one historian: "The use of the name Jesus gave great offense.Both on the Continent and in England, it was denounced as blasphemous; petitions were sent to kings and to civil and ecclesiastical tribunals to have it changed; and even Pope Sixtus V had signed a Brief to do away with it." But nothing came of all the opposition; there were already congregations named after the Trinity and as "God's daughters".As of 2016, 12 of the 28 Jesuit universities in the US had non-Jesuit lay presidents.